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Posture: Standing or Sitting

Posture plays a huge role in how we feel throughout the day. Whether it is standing or sitting, the way we position our bodies determines how our bodies act and perform. If you find yourself either standing or sitting throughout the day for long periods of time, you may notice yourself slouching into a bad posture every now and then. If so, try this exercise a couple of times a day to help strengthen the muscles responsible for maintaining a good posture and to help keep your body aware of how it is positioned. This exercise can be performed in either a standing or sitting position.

Active Standing:

First, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Press both of your big toes and heels into the floor to engage the muscles on the bottom of your foot. Then, make sure your knee caps are pointing forward and not inward. Twist your knees out if your kneecaps tend to cave in, this will help to engage your glute muscles.
Next, tighten your glutes and your core to ensure that your pelvis is in proper alignment.
Squeeze your shoulder blades down and back, and push your head straight up towards the ceiling.
Hold this position for 1-2 minutes and perform 2-3x per day.

Active Sitting:

While sitting, make sure the height of the chair is positioned so that your knees and hips both create a 90-degree angle. Then, similar to standing, press both of your big toes and heels into the floor to engage the muscles on the bottom of your foot.
Next, engage your hamstrings by trying to pull your feet in, towards your buttox, without actually doing so.
Squeeze your core, pull your shoulder blades down and back, and press your head straight up towards the ceiling.
Hold this position for 1-2 minutes and perform 2-3x per day.
Garrick LimGarrick Lim

Garrick Lim

Garrick believes that a whole body, hands-on approach is the best way to treat orthopedic and sports injuries because it allows his patients to gain a better understanding of their bodies and to take appropriate measures to ensure they remain pain/injury-free.

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